Plutarch's Lives: Volume I MOBI ✓ Plutarch's Lives:

Plutarch's Lives: Volume I Plutarch s Lives, written at the beginning of the second century AD is a social history of the ancient world by one of the greatest biographers and moralists of all time In what is by far his most famous and influential work, Plutarch reveals the character and personality of his subjects and how they led ultimately to tragedy or victory Richly anecdotal and full of detail, Volume I contains profiles and comparisons of Romulus and Theseus, Numa and Lycurgus, Fabius and Pericles, and many powerful figures of ancient Greece and Rome The present translation, originally published inin conjunction with a life of Plutarch by John Dryden, was revised in by the poet and scholar Arthur Hugh Clough, whose notes and preface are also included in this edition Publisher Modern LibraryAuthor Plutarch Translated by John Dryden VolumeFormatpages, paperback ISBN Theseus, Romulus, Lycurgus, Numa, Solon, Poplicola, Themistocles, Camillus, Pericles, Fabius, Alcibiadas, Coriolanes, Timoleon, Aemilius Paulus, Pelopidas, Marcellus, Aristides, Marcus Cato, Philopoemen, Flaminius, Pyrrhus, Caius Marius, Lysander, Sylla, Cimon, Lucullus, Nicias, Crassus


About the Author: Plutarch

Plutarch, later named, upon becoming a Roman citizen, Lucius Mestrius Plutarchus AD 46 AD 120 was a Greek historian, biographer, and essayist, known primarily for his Parallel Lives and Moralia He is classified as a Middle Platonist Plutarch s surviving works were written in Greek, but intended for both Greek and Roman readers.



10 thoughts on “Plutarch's Lives: Volume I

  1. says:

    beyond this there is nothing but prodigies and fictions, the only inhabitants are the poets and inventors of fablesPlutarch, The Lives of the Noble Grecians and Romans, Vol 1.Plutarch, one of the great early biographers summarizes the lives of Greek and Roman military and political leaders and compares them to illumina


  2. says:

    WHAT EVERY EDUCATED CITIZEN OF THE WORLD NEEDS TO KNOW IN THE 21ST CENTURY THE GREAT HISTORIANS OF WORLD HISTORY HERODOTUS, THUCYDIDES, SIMA QIAN, IBN KHALDUN, THE SECRET HISTORY OF THE MONGOLS, JULIUS CAESAR, PLUTARCH, LIVY, POLYBIUS, TACITUS, GIBBON, MARX, SPENGLER TOYNBEE FROM THE WORLD LITERATURE FORUM RECOMMENDED CL


  3. says:

    22 Plutarch s lives, The Dryden Translation, Volume 1, edited by Arthur Hugh Cloughwritten circa 120 cetranslation 1683 and not by Dryden editing and notes 1859format 785 page paperbackacquired Decemberread Feb 27 May 2time reading 48 hr 43 min, 3.7 min pagerating 3A weird decision to read this, but it s become somehow mea


  4. says:

    Plutarch s lives are an excellent place to start for a cursory study of the classical world Plutarch of Chaeronia in Greece in the days of the Roman Empire was not contemporary with many of the figures he biographizes, but draws heavily from primary sources and oral traditions no longer extant Don t forget also that he was a


  5. says:

    In which Plutarch exposits and preaches the natural law using a host of biographical case studies from Greek and Roman history He s a pagan, yes, but he s also attuned to the moral law written on men s hearts as well as the wisdom of common experience available to imperfect, fallen rationality and perception God has not left u


  6. says:

    It is a shame that such an interesting, and historically valuable work such as Plutarch s lives is so difficult for modern readers Though many others have commented on how difficult this English is for us, consider the following quote taken at random, from the first two sentences of the life of the Roman Camillus Among the many


  7. says:

    One of the devices of Plutarch is to draw comparisons between the famous Greeks and later Romans For instance, the first sketch in this version features the Athenian Theseus Plutarch equates him to a Roman founder, Romulus There is the story of Themistocles, whose talents helped to defeat the Persian fleet at Salamis and whose str


  8. says:

    Plutarch is a fantastic storyteller and historian He is usually careful to cite his sources and he frequently discusses variant accounts of events, but, far from being a dry academic, he brings the men he writes about to vibrant life He also doesn t mind spicing his stories up with some gossip, although he usually notes when his sto


  9. says:

    In fact I read only two on Alexander and Cicero in Lives 2 since I m interested in their lives as described and analyzed by Plutarch I found it a bit tough due to Dryden s style of translation, that is, his Victorian style lengthy sentences In this Lives 1, I m going to read on Pericles whose famous funeral speech at Athens as recorde


  10. says:

    Dense And not a lot of fun.Plutarch, a Greek in the first century A.D who later became a Roman citizen, drafted his Lives as a moral inquiry He selected from history a well known Greek and a well known Roman and wrote briefly on each He then concludes with a couple pages comparing their lives in terms of who can be thought of as a bette


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