[Ebook] ➨ The Man Who Was Thursday By G.K. Chesterton – Prestigelakesidehabitat.info

The Man Who Was Thursday Perhaps Best Known To The General Public As Creator Of The Father Brown Detective Stories, GK Chesterton Was Especially Renowned For His Wit, Rhetorical Brilliance And Talent For Ingenious And Revealing Paradox Those Qualities Are Richly Brilliant In The Present Volume, A Hilarious, Fast Paced Tale About A Club Of Anarchists In Turn Of The Century London The Story Begins When Gabriel Syme, A Poet And Member Of A Special Group Of Philosophical Policemen, Attends A Secret Meeting Of Anarchists, Whose Leaders Are Named For The Days Of The Week, And All Of Whom Are Sworn To Destroy The World Their Chief Is The Mysterious Sunday Huge, Boisterous, Full Of Vitality, A Wild Personage Who May Be A Chestertonian Vision Of God Or Nature Or Both When Syme, Actually An Undercover Detective, Is Unexpectedly Elected To Fill A Vacancy On The Anarchists Central Council, The Plot Takes The First Of Many Surprising Twists And Turns Humanity crushed once again 50 dead, 120 injured Grave face of terror strikes again Familiar headlines scream through the pages of the newspapers each time a bomb goes off annihilating blameless lives Through teeth gritting resilience, public outcry resonates through the deafened ears of failed intelligence and faith in the state s law and order hangs by a thin string As the weeks pass by rapid sketches of the alleged bombers, email links, forensic reports, collected evidence from theHumanity crushed once again 50 dead, 120 injured Grave face of terror strikes again Familiar headlines scream through the pages of the newspapers each time a bomb goes off annihilating blameless lives Through teeth gritting resilience, public outcry resonates through the deafened ears of failed intelligence and faith in the state s law and order hangs by a thin string As the weeks pass by rapid sketches of the alleged bombers, email links, forensic reports, collected evidence from the attacked ground and pictures of rehabilitating victims are splashed across the dailies If by any chance the investigation comes through, anonymous visages covered with black rags are photographed outside the courtroom, readied for trial procedures, which may go on for months, maybe even years As the days go by, life returns to normalcy yes It is a tricky word everything is forgotten and the news fade until once again humanity is crushed by another dastardly attack The analytical carnival starts once again This is the time I dearly wish we had philosophical policemen just like Chesterton describes in his book Policemen officers of law , who would discover the book of sonnets and verses from where the crimes will be committed those that recognize the intricate web of intellectual crimes The derivation of dreadful thoughts the human mind, so malicious and calculating camouflaged within an affluent, composed and erudite exterior It is that very egocentric brainpower which churns out sadistic alterations from harmless verses and then picks vulnerable actors to craft that design into realismEvil philosopher is not trying to alter things but to annihilate them This book isthan a mere plot of undercover detectives and their clandestine exploration of the Secret anarchist Councilmen Chesterton pens that a small time criminal isof a good person His aim is to eradicated only a certain obstacle and not annihilate the edifice What caught my eye in one of the chapters was the elucidation of stereotyping poverty to rebellious festeringYou ve got that eternal idiotic ides that if anarchy came it would come from the poor Why should it The poor been rebels, but they have never been anarchists they haveinterest than anyone else in there being some decent government The poor man really has a stake in the country The rich man hasn t he can go away to New Guinea in a yacht The poor have sometimes objected to being governed badly the rich have always objected to being governed at all Aristocrats are always anarchists as you can see from the baron s wars.When a bomber or an active terrorist is caught, he mostly turns out to be from an impoverished background, where his ravenous mind and mislaid faith is manipulated to find refuge in an illusionary godly abode These are mere actors for crying out loud, chosen by the scheming selfish elements who are coward enough to remain behind the backstage curtains The affluent as elucidated in this narration are the ones to be feared They have an abundance of monetary resources, have sheltering capacity in far away lands, if need be and have a mind that concocts the unexpected Where do you think the enormous funds come for fertilizing terror I do not want elucidate detailed reports of various pathways of monetary funds wired to definite cults or charitable institutions that ultimately fund the immoral actions But, the currency sure is not a bequest from the poor or some excise complements from our paychecks The respective courtesy comes from those societal fundamentals that remain unscathed or unfazed by decree Who do you suppose manages the advanced scientific technologies in various bombing devices The knowledgeable elite, isn t it The erudite or should I say the cr me de la cr me of religious preachers who instead of spreading peace and equality manipulates vulnerable populace digging their raw wounds every time through words that revolt in their bleeding wounds I could go on and on, as it angers me to see such naivety among the elements of law and order or purposefully turning a blind eye on the so called modernists who may be responsible in concocting the ongoing mayhem of lawlessness Why couldn t there be some philosophical policemen here in India or any place that incessantly plays the role of a powerless victim Chapter 4 The Tale of the Detective is the deciding chapter that outlines infinitesimal details of who Gabriel Syme really is Syme sneaks his way into a clandestine council of seven men, each named after a day of the week Syme becomes the inevitable Thursday though a pact he made with Lucian Gregory ,a poet and a true anarchist Fear catches with Syme as his path deepens into the sinister world of the other six council men the President being the most feared of all Chesterton throws a light on various aspects of fear that thrives within and outside us We rebel against the only side that corrupts us What makes a mutineer and destroy the very notion of survival We try and run from fear and pain, until one eventually catches up and makes us susceptible to uncouth rudiments that shelter our mental nakedness It is the most treacherous survival, if every time we need proof of familiarity to feel safe When fear caught up with Syme suffocating his senses, he would feel protected only if a blue card a source of identification given to every policemen in England was shown to him How vulnerable was Syme to live in a world of treachery and deceit Makes me think of all the trepidation we feel every time we walk outside our homes or travel the security checks, the sense of familiarity that we seek in bloodcurdling situations, the proof of safety that we search or reveal spins a web of utter vulnerability that looms within the safest corners of our thoughts The Man Who Was Thursday is a treasure that needs to be dug up by reading between the lines of a puzzling narrative to know what Chesterton is really sayingRevolt in its abstract can be revolting It is like vomiting Lastly, if everything leads to God and when nature if dissected reveals the face of God, then should I assume that evil is illusionary Is malevolence the creation of couple menacing minds If God means endurance then why is such mutinous extermination carried in God s name after all They say that LSD was first synthesisterised in 1938, so it couldn t be that But opium was imbibed in British society as we know from Thomas de Quincy up to Sherlock Holmes, so I m going with opium.This strange novel is a phantasmagoria which begins as a surrealistic spoof of Boy s Own detective adventures in which our hero infiltrates the central council of the evil anarchists who are bent on destroying human society Gatheringabsurd elements elephant chases through central London, medi They say that LSD was first synthesisterised in 1938, so it couldn t be that But opium was imbibed in British society as we know from Thomas de Quincy up to Sherlock Holmes, so I m going with opium.This strange novel is a phantasmagoria which begins as a surrealistic spoof of Boy s Own detective adventures in which our hero infiltrates the central council of the evil anarchists who are bent on destroying human society Gatheringabsurd elements elephant chases through central London, medieval dance raves , it ends up as some kind of incoherent religious parable The only sense I could make of it was that the message is Hindu all of the world is divine, all of the world is God, all of the world is God dancing joyously with herself That s about it, if anyone can nail it downthan that, I m all ears.As I read this, two things struck me, aside from thinking GK Chesterton s cocoa had been spiked with acid I thought of an Arthur Penn movie from 1966 called The Chase, which begins conventionally and gets weirder and wilder as it progresses must see that one again And I thought that I ve never come across so many beards in a single novel maybe GK was a male facial hair fetishist every character, and they re ALL men, has their beard or lack of beard carefully noted, so many beards there are that each time I opened my copy I thought I heard sociologists singing folk songs.In one word bonkers The Man Who Was Thursday reads like P.G Wodehouse writing from a Phillip K Dick plot while on a Nyquil bender It begins with two poets arguing in the park about whether poetry isakin to law or anarchy It turns out that the poet espousing anarchy is actually a member of an anarchist soceity and takes Syme, the other poet, to their meeting place to prove it after a vow of secrecy Syme is actually a member of an anti anarchy branch of Scotland Yard and usurps Gregory s spot as the new Th The Man Who Was Thursday reads like P.G Wodehouse writing from a Phillip K Dick plot while on a Nyquil bender It begins with two poets arguing in the park about whether poetry isakin to law or anarchy It turns out that the poet espousing anarchy is actually a member of an anarchist soceity and takes Syme, the other poet, to their meeting place to prove it after a vow of secrecy Syme is actually a member of an anti anarchy branch of Scotland Yard and usurps Gregory s spot as the new Thursday in the Council.Gabriel Symes tells the story of his own recruitment into Scotland Yard by a philosopher policeman and goes on to infiltrate the Council of Days, each one taking the name of a day of the week.None of the Council members are what they seemed at first glance About halfway through, I was convinced none of them were actually anarchists.I m a little torn between whether I like this better than The Napoleon of Notting Hill They probably really shouldn t be compared since they re different kinds of books 2 Loved the language and loved the beginning It s like a mad Monty Python story, but it lost me half way through And to be fair, the Python crew, Terry Pratchett and others may well have been weaned on tales from Chesterton, so perhaps he should getcredit.The main character, Syme, is a detective who is invited to a secret meeting of anarchists who are preparing to overthrow governments using bombs He promises Gregory, the man who invited him, not to divulge anything of what he says Gre 2 Loved the language and loved the beginning It s like a mad Monty Python story, but it lost me half way through And to be fair, the Python crew, Terry Pratchett and others may well have been weaned on tales from Chesterton, so perhaps he should getcredit.The main character, Syme, is a detective who is invited to a secret meeting of anarchists who are preparing to overthrow governments using bombs He promises Gregory, the man who invited him, not to divulge anything of what he says Gregory, in turn, promises to keep Syme s police identity secret Both are champing at the bit to break their promises, butSyme attends a meeting to find the President is called Sunday, and the other members are named after days of the week, with a convenient vacancy for Thursday He finds himself elected to be Thursday Now what Is he expected to bomb someone Where How He finds their next meeting at a very public restaurant breakfast table where they all openly discuss anarchy and laugh loudly The theory is that they will be taken for fools and disregarded which seems to be true.In amongst the kind of boys own action, there is a lot of musing and pondering and observing and pontificating on Life, some of which I quite enjoyed, especially considering this was written over a hundred years ago Most of the women were of the kind vaguely called emancipated, and professed some protest against male supremacy Yet these new women would always pay to a man the extravagant compliment which no ordinary woman ever pays to him, that of listening while he is talking And it is always the humble man who talks too much the proud man watches himself too closely I quite like this explanation of the power of monogamythere are no words to express the abyss between isolation and having one ally It may be conceded to the mathematicians that four is twice two But two is not twice one two is two thousand times one That is why, in spite of a hundred disadvantages, the world will always return to monogamy And I ll leave you with a last one that could explain today s politics The poor have sometimes objected to being governed badly the rich have always objected to being governed at all I enjoyed Syme s gradual uncovering of the secret society, but eventually, the story wore thin I m afraid this doesn t stand up very well against the many years of fantasy and science fiction that have been written since, but I assume it must have been a cracker of a story in its day What What the hell did I just read Anarchists and poets That part was deliciously, rebelliously fun to read No doubt this is a novel idea and Chesterton s imagination is superb The first 30 40 pages were awesome and I thought this could be my next 5 star rating As I began to read this book enthralled I found myself smiling frequently, laughing often, and being thoroughly impressed.Then I found myself lost in an absurdist, magical realism murky realm of steam punk whatthehell And then the What What the hell did I just read Anarchists and poets That part was deliciously, rebelliously fun to read No doubt this is a novel idea and Chesterton s imagination is superb The first 30 40 pages were awesome and I thought this could be my next 5 star rating As I began to read this book enthralled I found myself smiling frequently, laughing often, and being thoroughly impressed.Then I found myself lost in an absurdist, magical realism murky realm of steam punk whatthehell And then the ending a steaming hot cup of damnedifIknowwhatthehellhewasgettingatsomekindofChristianallegory.Chesterton s mastery of the English language, his rare skill at irony and his insidious ability to turn a phrase are on shining display in this 1908 publication There are likely English professors out there who will say this was the best thing since macaroni and cheese.But not me Boy, this was really good until it wasn t at all any An intriguing story which suddenly turned into some sort of muddled message about patriotism Capitalism Christianity Anarchy Communism The soul of all mankind How redheads are hot and god is fat Don t know, don t care.Blah Skip it. A very original, wonderfully quirky, thought provoking little book about an English detective who infiltrates a group of anarchists Part fantasy, part mystery, part philosophical, lots of Christian symbolism that is not apparent until later in the book, but you don t have to be a Christian to enjoy it There is so much going on here that I will have to reread it at some point. .G K Chesterton , G K Chesterton , , , This book is on my favorite shelf but was missing a review, even though I loved it from the very first time I encountered it Time to set things straight The Man Who Was Thursday A Nightmare is a unique book, that starts as a spy novel with a very compelling premise of underground anarchists, a mysterious police force and a game of hide and seek Pretty early on there s shimmers of philosophical ramblings that will grow into an overpowering element later in the book A table in a bar that tu This book is on my favorite shelf but was missing a review, even though I loved it from the very first time I encountered it Time to set things straight The Man Who Was Thursday A Nightmare is a unique book, that starts as a spy novel with a very compelling premise of underground anarchists, a mysterious police force and a game of hide and seek Pretty early on there s shimmers of philosophical ramblings that will grow into an overpowering element later in the book A table in a bar that turns out to be an elevator way down to the anarchists local headquarters is the beginning of the spy novel ride getting bumpier, wilder and certainly stranger Soon you ll find that nothing is what it seems The anarchists are mysterious and darkly looming, and you dread being there when their plans and identities are exposed But it s the mission at hand to unmask these devils and as Gabriel Syme, the protagonist poet detective, walks closer to his goal his steps become a glide and he slowly seems to lose control over where he s going to Things get weirder and the tumble down the rabbit hole gains in pace Elephants give chase to hot air balloons through English landscapes and snow starts falling on summer days And so the book itself turns into something that you d never expect it to, given the way the stage was set Sure, it says so in the title a nightmare , but it s often quite funny and not really scary enough to fall under that category Anarchists have lost some of their fear factor since the time this book was written, so I imagine it must have beenof a nightmare to Chesterton s original readership This book doesn t scare like a nightmare does, not until Sunday gets in the picture, that is By the end of the book I wasn t quite sure how the hell I got there or even where I was, but I loved the ride Magical realism, philosophy, humour and a very sharp pen all in one book, and it seems to be well ahead of its time All this is coming from an author who s mostly known for books on Christian orthodoxy, which in itself seemed somehow surprising, even though Christian philosophy is clearly present, especially towards the end But it s not dry at all, not at all like how I would have expected someone preaching orthodoxy to deliver his message Additionally, the idea of having weekdays as codenames somehow strikes an enormous chord with me It just seems all thesinister by using these everyday codenames I wonder if this is where the Reservoir Dogs got their inspiration from, or if it really was just MM s and Skittles All I can say is that the title alone completely hooked me, and I m glad it did, because the rest of the story reeled me in My first encounter with this novel was through a video game, Deus Ex I m adding this reference because it introduced me to many books, such as Gravity s Rainbow Pynchon, which I haven t read yet , Underworld DeLillo, not read yet either and The Napoleon of Notting Hill written by Chesterton as well The Man Who Was Thursday in particular was presented in this game with small excerpts of dialogues, whose power and intriguing nature even as stand alone pieces of text completely won me over Pun intended


About the Author: G.K. Chesterton

Gilbert Keith Chesterton 1874 1936 was born in London, educated at St Paul s, and went to art school at University College London In 1900, he was asked to contribute a few magazine articles on art criticism, and went on to become one of the most prolific writers of all time He wrote a hundred books, contributions to 200 , hundreds of poems, including the epic Ballad of the White Horse, fi Gilbert Keith Chesterton 1874 1936 was born in London, educated at St Paul s, and went to art school at University College London In 1900, he was asked to contribute a few magazine articles on art criticism, and went on to become one of the most prolific writers of all time He wrote a hundred books, contributions to 200 , hundreds of poems, including the epic Ballad of the White Horse, five plays, five novels, and some two hundred short stories, including a popular series featuring the priest detective, Father Brown In spite of his literary accomplishments, he considered himself primarily a journalist He wrote over 4000 newspaper essays, including 30 years worth of weekly columns for the Illustrated London News, and 13 years of weekly columns for the Daily News He also edited his own newspaper, G.K s Weekly.Chesterton was equally at ease with literary and social criticism, history, politics, economics, philosophy, and theology


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